Task 5: Shiny Materials

OBJECTIVE: Understanding other material textures and applying tone.

TASK: Make a drawing of a knife, fork and spoon, using either charcoal or pencil.

 

You will find my earlier demonstrations of this task in our earlier blogs.

Here is the resource link: Cutlery

And also the demonstration:  https://youtu.be/zug8Z879R84

 

But this time I will do a different variation to expand on the idea of observational drawing of shiny objects, like cutlery. To do this, I will demonstrate black paper and a method called highlight drawing.

For this, I will be using chalks, but coloured pencils and crayons could also be used. This will help you to see tone in the reverse and use your observation skills to pick out the main areas of tone.

 

TIPS

Before I started on the drawing for this tutorial, the first thing I did was set up a composition just a few feet away: observing from real life is essential. If using a lamp for your lighting, I would turn off all the other lights in the room to increase contrast and clarify each shadow. It’s extremely important to make good lighting for yourself when you’re drawing indoors. If you don’t have that strong directional light, you won’t be able to see the shadows and highlights and your drawing will most likely turn out grey and visually flat.

Something you might like to try when observing the initial contours of your set- up is to squint with one eye when you draw! This helps because it eliminates depth perception and makes the subject you’re drawing appear flat. Be consistent in which eye you use, though; if you switch eyes you’ll see the objects move slightly, which can mess you up.

Spending too much time looking at your paper—instead of your subject—won’t work, and it’s easy to understand why. If your eyes are always on your paper, you won’t ever be seeing what you’re supposed to be drawing. So when you draw or paint, flick your eyes back and forth and never let them rest for too long in one place. With practice, your eyes will do this naturally, but it’s important if you’re just starting out to do it purposefully at first, to build up the habit.

Erase when you see something wrong! Don’t just leave your mistakes there—fix them! If you can see a problem early on, your finished drawing will have it too. By then you won’t want to go all the way back and change everything, so get it right before you’re too far in. What a lot of people don’t understand is that the most important part of any drawing is the initial line drawing. So always erase if you need to, because once you’ve got a good line drawing, you’re home free.

When the drawing is almost finished, I usually take a breather, walk around, and then come back to finish it.  After being away for a while, you’ll be able see if there are mistakes or places that should be completed but somehow got overlooked. Fix those, and at the same time use your eraser to pick out the brightest highlights in your drawing.

 

I will demonstrate in our next Facebook Live lesson so I hope to see you there and finish our task on still life observational drawing.

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

OCAD Studio: Limited Palette Portrait in Oils Part 4

Refining the Colours

After successfully completing the previous stages, you will have all the major elements of your portrait blocked in. However, you may find that the colours are more grey than you would like, so the next step will be to make adjustments, adding chroma and shifting the hues where necessary. This will result in an ideal foundation for smoothing out forms and adding detail in the next two lessons.

 

 

Materials

 

    • Small canvas or a panel prepared for painting
    • 2-3 flat brushes (¼-1 inch wide)
    • 2 small pointed brushes
    • Piece of soft charcoal

 

  • Titanium White Oil Paint
  • Cadmium Red Oil Paint
  • Yellow Ochre Oil Paint
  • Ivory Black Oil Paint

 

  • Palette
  • Easel
  • Thinner (I recommend odourless mineral spirits (OMS))
  • Linseed Oil
  • Painting rag or kitchen paper towel for wiping back and cleaning

 

Process

 

  1. Look at the colours in your painting –  they will likely look greyer and deader than you would want.
  2. Using the values and forms established in the previous lesson, mix new colours to adjust the hue and chroma where necessary. This will likely require you to use pure mixtures of yellow ochre, cadmium red and white.
  3. It shouldn’t take long to make these adjustments because you will keep the forms and shapes developed in the previous lessons. Simply add new patches of colour where necessary.
    1. Thinly painting a darker colour over a lighter section of the painting is a glaze – this will result in a warmer colour.
    2. Conversely – painting a lighter colour over a darker section of the painting is a scumble – this will enhance the coolness of the colour.
  4. If the opportunity presents itself, you can add details and smoother transitions but you don’t have to. Your primary concern is making sure the colour and chroma/saturation is correct in the portrait.
  5. When you’re happy with how everything looks, leave the painting to dry completely

Task 4: Graphite Still Life Drawing

Mastering observational drawing

By nature most artists strive to create illusions.

In this task we will be manipulating values and using what we learned earlier on contour drawing, to create the illusion of form using Graphite.

 

First Objective:

-Use Contour lines to create the basic shape

End goal:
-Recognize and use value and colour to create the “illusion” of form.

 

STEP ONE: REVIEW
1.  Reviewing contour drawings for a couple of days. Make sure that you understand;
-What a contour is
-Understand the different types of Contours

2. You should draw objects using contour techniques for a couple of days. Make sure that each drawing has a specific goal or benchmark. Look at my Contour drawing lesson from Task 1 to help

3. Practice, Practice, Practice!

4. Address the following questions and check you understand:
-What is value?
-Why do we need value?
-What does it help an artist achieve?

 

We are going to draw drinks cans. The basic cylinder form is further challenged by the details on a drinks can.

So, to start, you need to try to resist adding tone at first and get the contours perfect on your can.

What you need:

  1. A tonal photograph of the can in the perfect light and angle
  2. The actual can set up in front of you to observe from directly
  3. Your tonal scale in graphite ready to use for shading
  4. Quality white paper

Focusing on what is in front of you, draw the contours of the can (the outlines).

 

I will show examples in the live demonstration of how I go about this, but also I will challenge this task further…I am going to crush the can!!

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

OCAD Studio: Limited Palette Portrait in Oils Part 3

Dead Colouring

 

The purpose of this stage is to block in all the major tones and colours. You do not need to go for lots of detail, just use large masses to give an effective impression of the subject. You will work from dark halftones to lights across the portrait, this will establish a sense of form and light. Once everything is well balanced, you will leave the painting to dry before returning to refine the individual forms of the subject (nose, eyes, mouth and hair etc.).

 

Materials

    • Small canvas or a panel prepared for painting
    • 2-3 flat brushes (¼-1 inch wide)
    • 2 small pointed brushes
    • Piece of soft charcoal

 

  • Titanium White Oil Paint
  • Cadmium Red Oil Paint
  • Yellow Ochre Oil Paint
  • Ivory Black Oil Paint

 

  • Palette
  • Easel
  • Thinner (I recommend odourless mineral spirits (OMS))
  • Linseed Oil
  • Painting rag or kitchen paper towel for wiping back and cleaning

Process

  1. Begin by adding the lightest value on your portrait, usually the lightest part of the face (if lit from above this would be the forehead). Try to get the right hue by mixing yellow ochre and cadmium red with white. Be careful not to add cadmium red too quickly as it has a high tinting strength and will make everything very red very quickly!
  2. Once you’re happy with the lightest value, clean your brush or take a new one and mix a colour for the darkest halftone, this will use a mixture of all four pigments. It should be slightly lighter than the shadow and emerge from the bedbug line that you established while adding variations to the shadows.
  3. Now that you have your lightest colour and darkest colour blocked in you can work progressively from dark to light, adding paint in large masses. Don’t blend too much as this will make your painting mushy and indistinct.
  4. As a general rule your, colours should get higher chroma (more saturated) as they get lighter. This enhance the luminosity of the portrait. If you struggle to balance the hue, value and chroma, don’t worry too much. It will be possible to correct things with glazing and scumbling in later stages. The most important thing is that the values are correct as they will give a sense of form and 3Dness to the painting.
  5. Once you’ve blocked in all the colours in the face, you can add hair, clothing and the background. Feel free to be looser with these parts as the focal point of the image is the face.
  6. When you’re happy with how everything looks, leave the painting to dry completely

 

OCAD Studio: Limited Palette Portrait in Oils Part 2

Adding Variations to the Shadows

 

Materials

    • Small canvas or a panel prepared with a mid grey/brown value.
    • 2-3 flat brushes (¼-1 inch wide)
    • 2 small pointed brushes
    • Piece of soft charcoal

 

  • Titanium White Oil Paint
  • Cadmium Red Oil Paint
  • Yellow Ochre Oil Paint
  • Ivory Black Oil Paint

 

  • Palette
  • Easel
  • Thinner (I recommend odourless mineral spirits (OMS))
  • Linseed Oil
  • Painting rag or kitchen paper towel for wiping back and cleaning

Process

  1. Start by adding the darkest darks (most likely pure black) to the shadow shapes you sketched in part 1. The darkest areas will usually be the creases or places where direct and reflected right can’t reach, so parts of the nose and ear often have dark accents. Dark hair will also have areas which are pure black.
  2. Try to keep the shadows fairly thin/diluted by mixing in some mineral spirits with your paint.
  3. The next darkest part of the shadows after the creases are the ’bedbug lines’ – the lines that separate shadow shapes from light shapes. This part of the form doesn’t receive any direct light or any reflected light making it much darker than the average value of the shadows.
  4. Once the darkest values are in, you can add progressively lighter colours to the shadows. Work from dark to light as this will help you to control the values and colours as you add them.
  5. You should notice that the areas with the most reflected light the lightest and highest chroma parts of the shadows
  6. Your palette has black, cadmium red, yellow ochre and white, you will need to find the right combination of these three pigments to capture the sense of the reference image or subject.
  7. If you mix black and white, the result will be a cool grey, whereas cadmium red and yellow ochre will make a bright orange. Use these shifts to make subtle shifts between warm and cools in the shadows.
  8. Take time to shift the values, hues and temperatures back and forth as you try to match the relationships in the reference or your subject.
  9. Once you’re happy with the shadows, wash your brushes and palette and leave the painting until dry to the touch (at least 3 days).