OCAD Studio: Basic Brushwork

Key:

Each number is different brush.

a) This brushstroke is made with paint straight from the tube.

b) This brushstroke is made with paint thinned with medium so it’s less viscous.

 

  1. Small Pointed Round Brush (Soft Haired)
    1. The thick paint deposits at the beginning of the brushstroke and then drags across the grain of the paper. The soft brush hairs aren’t able to push the paint along.
    2. These brushstrokes were made with progressively thinner paint. You can see that as more medium is mixed in, the brushstroke becomes more sustained and smooth (it doesn’t drag).

 

  1. Medium Pointed Round Brush (Soft Haired)
    1. Once again, the paint deposits and then drags across the grain of the paper. This time it carries a bit further as the brush is bigger and has more hairs to hold the paint.
    2. Once medium is mixed in, the brushstrokes become much more fluid and look calligraphic. Notice that the beginning of the stroke is round, like the shape of the brush. As the brush is lifted the stroke becomes narrow, making for tapered strokes (see top right corner of the box).

 

  1. Large Round Brush (Soft Haired)
    1. This brush still drags the thick paint, but because it’s even bigger and the hairs are dense, it carries the paint further.
    2. The thinned paint applies well and makes for a rich stroke. You can see that the brushstroke tapers well.

 

  1. Long Haired Flat Brush (Soft Haired)
    1. This long haired brush is quite small, so like the small round, it can’t drag the dry paint far and deposits it straight away (before dragging across the surface).
    2. A bit of medium makes the stroke much more consistent. Notice that because the brush is square at the top, it makes a square shape at the beginning of the brushstroke (unlike the rounds, with make a round shape). If used on its side, this type of brush can make a fine line (better than a small round). See the video for more info.

 

  1. Short Haired Flat Brush (Soft Haired)
    1. This brush still drags the thick paint, but because it’s even bigger and the hairs are dense, it carries the paint further.
    2. Once medium is mixed in, the brushstrokes become much more fluid. It is still possible to get a good fine line with this brush even though it’s wide. If you play around with twisting and rolling the brush, you can make a lot of complex shapes with a single brushstroke.

 

  1. Wide Flat Bristle
    1. This bristle has much thicker hairs so it can apply much more thick paint in a single stroke. This is because it is stronger and able to push the paint across the surface, like a trowel. It is very useful for applying impastos, blocking in paint initially, and adding texture.
    2. Interestingly, the bristle is worse at applying the thinned paint, this is because it doesn’t hold as much liquid (compared to the softer brush) and doesn’t channel the thin paint to the tip of the brush.

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1 Comment

  1. Elisabeth Fiagbo

    i am much interested in drawing and painting and this is great. can you help me with the basic tools i need. thank you

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