Kieran’s Video Classes

Trained in classical techniques in Florence, Italy, Kieran has been featured on Sky’s Landscape Artist of the Year and Sky’s Portrait Artist of the Year. He currently exhibits his work with galleries worldwide. His weekly classes on drawing and painting range from the fundamentals to the more complex!

Jemma’s Free Task Videos

As an accomplished artist of many years, and a fully qualified art teacher, the drawing and painting videos from Jemma will be invaluable to you. Start with her 17-part video course first to take you from the very beginning of the artists’ journey. By the end of this, you won’t know yourself!

Student Portfolio Case Study Videos

We regularly interview our most successful students, so you can see first-hand what’s required to qualify and push on. Watching our students talk through their work, the hard graft behind it, the support they received every step of the way, and sharing in their joy at their results, will not fail to motivate you!

Task 3: Charcoal Forms

Learning to Draw: TASK 3

You can use a range of Charcoal equipment, but I like for this task to look at the effects I can get using the blocks of Charcoal! They create such dark effects and so you can achieve eye popping results due to the tonal range you can create.

Charcoal pencils are great too…but the skills you are learning from using Graphite are being utilised again. The reason I like to encourage students to grab the blocks is to widen their experience and knowledge of alternatives. So, come out of your comfort zone and grab a compressed charcoal block for this task 🙂

 

Other Equipment that is useful:

Putter rubber / kneaded eraser is crucial for the technique I will show in my next video (Facebook live tutorial). Willow sticks are nice but more light and good for midtones… the break easy and smudge easy too- this is good for some effects but the block you will get a solid black covering.

White charcoal, or even a white chalk stick, is great for making highlights when using midtone paper- I will be! Creating a stark tonal range, and again, making that eye popping result.

So, the paper… Brown parcel paper is what I use in my demonstrations. I really love this paper as it is textured, providing a rougher surface to work on. This holds powder media really well and allows for harsh mark making. It can be cut to any length when bought on a roll, so it adds to your flexibility of what you can create. White paper usually is set to one size and when working in a sketchbook it can restrict creativity sometimes.

For this task, I will go big! I want to work on nothing less than A3 for sample and produce a final outcome around A1 size…don’t be daunted by this, it is great and much easier to do when you have blocks of media to spread all over the surface in no time at all 🙂

The Task

For this task you are continuing your skill building with using tone. By using Charcoal this time, you will not only be trialling a new medium, you will also be using much darker tones and testing how you see tones in these forms.

You first need to add the tonal scale to the universal forms; Cube, Cylinder, Sphere and Cone. This allows you to understand the range of forms you will encounter when taking on a still life observation in the future. If you can shade these 4 forms, it is commonly thought you can apply tone to any object you may want to draw 🙂

You may wish to use your own photography and still life compositions to further explore adding tone to your art. Check out the resource for inspiration and guidance;

charcoal practice

Also, see me in this quick demo to see how to use charcoal in different ways 🙂

 

I will be on Facebook soon giving another tutorial using this great media! Look forward to seeing you there 🙂

Enjoy!

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there:)

Task 1 Learning to Observe

OBSERVATION

One day students were asked to copy a Picasso drawing upside down.
That small experiment, more than anything else, showed that something
very different is going on during the act of drawing. To everyone’s surprise the
finished drawings were so extremely well done that the class were asked, “How
come you can draw upside down when you can’t draw right-side up?”

 

The students responded,
“Upside down, we didn’t know what we
were drawing.”

 

You have two brains: a left and a right. Modern brain scientists now know that your left brain is your verbal and rational brain; it thinks serially and reduces its thoughts to numbers, letters and words

Your right brain is your nonverbal and intuitive brain; it thinks in patterns, or pictures, composed of ‘whole things,’ and does not comprehend reductions, either numbers, letters, or words.

 

Drawing is not really very difficult. Seeing is the problem, or, to be more specific, shifting to a particular way of seeing. You may not believe me at this moment. You may feel that you are seeing things just fine and that it’s the drawing that is hard. But the opposite is true.

Broadly speaking, except for the degree of complexity, all drawing is the same. One drawing task is no harder than any other. The same skills and ways of seeing are involved in drawing still-life setups, landscapes, the figure, random objects, even imaginary subjects, and portrait drawing. It’s all the same thing: You see what’s out there (imaginary subjects are “seen” in the mind’s eye) and you draw what you see.

 

What is the purpose of Upside Down Drawing?

The purpose of this kind of practice is to force your left (thinking) side of the brain to give up identifying what you draw. So, even if you have a little voice that tells you the name of features or things, – ignore it! Instead, focus on a specific line and concentrate on its direction and where it lies in relation to the lines
around it.
If you do have trouble with matching things up as you come to the end of the drawing, this is because it is out of proportion. That doesn’t matter, just connect it all as best as you can because the benefit remains.

So begin by trialling this technique and drawing this horse, upside down:

You will find the horse, and the more challenging Picasso line drawing, on this following resource so you can print them and then copy what you see. To make things even easier, draw a grid over your image and also onto your page- then you can copy each square in turn…but remember, upside down.

Click here: upside down

I’m sure when you are more aware of using the right side of your brain, you will find your observation skills significantly improve. Remember that everything you need to know in order to draw the image is right in front of your eyes. All of the information is right there, making it easy for you. Don’t make it complicated. It really is as simple as that.

Tips

If you feel confused by a large picture, try placing paper over the picture and just reveal one portion at a time. You’ll only need to do this once or twice. When your confidence builds, you won’t even notice the whole picture, you will
only be seeing the lines you are copying. This may not work for everyone
 do what feels right for you to ‘simplify’ what you are seeing.

At some point, the drawing may begin to seem like an interesting, even fascinating, puzzle. When this happens, you will be “really drawing,” meaning that you have successfully shifted to R-mode and you are seeing clearly. This state is easily broken. For example, if someone were to come into the room and ask, “How are you doing?” your verbal system would be reactivated and your focus and concentration would be over. This is also true if you have the TV on in the background or music playing with recognisable lyrics.

Copy the picture just as you see it and don’t be tempted to turn it the right side up at any time. You can start anywhere on your page that you
feel comfortable with. It’s fine if you wish to erase. Sometimes our judgment is a little bit out

 

Simple isn’t it? This technique helps to set you on the path of seeing the way an artist sees! That, in turn, helps you properly illustrate whatever you want. Upside down drawing develops your ability to see only lines and shapes and their relation to each other which is the ultimate aim for all artists 🙂

 

During our next tutorial, we will also look at ‘The Grid Method’ which will help many of you learn this technique quicker and be even more successful 🙂

Keep an eye on our Facebook Page to tune in to our live session Coming Soon!

 

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

 

 

Task 4: Graphite Still Life

Task 4

Graphite Still Life

 

This tutorial is mainly going to focus on the preparation of your still life art work.

Taking photographs and exploring your subject before taking on a drawing is very important. 

Why spend time producing your own photography? Not just grab an image off the internet to copy?

Firstly, you have to think of your own development and creating unique art works. Taking inspiration is great, but then applying that knowledge and setting up your own compositions is important for how you see your art evolving in the future. Plus, you need the objects in front of you to create a better observation drawing…the photo is just an additional tool to prep the outcome 🙂

 

Things to consider:

Composition

  • Rule of odds
  • Rule of thirds
  • No clutter
  • Frame the image well
  • Range of tone
  • Range of forms

Ideas for objects

  • Cans
  • Crushed cans
  • Shells
  • Fruit and Veg
  • Shoes
  • Toys / Lego
  • Origami
  • Ornate objects

Have some objects ready to take photos of and preparation will be discussed in our upcoming live tutorial. When the tutorial has happened, a clip will be posted below for future reference 🙂 Enjoy

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 3 Charcoal

Drawing the universal forms is great practice before taking on more challenging still life drawing. It allows you to learn about how light and shadow work on the main forms for all future drawing. It also gives you chance to experiment with a new media…in this case, charcoal.

You are aiming to produce each of the main forms: Cube, Cylinder, Sphere and Cone, using your charcoal media.

To get a richer experience, do try to leave the confines of a sketchbook. Larger pieces of paper work very well and allow for different expression of markings. Being able to smudge easily, you will find covering large papers much easier than with graphite.

Try white paper, but also tonal and black papers. I like to use brown parcel paper as it has a bit of texture, it’s cheap, and you can buy a roll and have the freedom to cut it to any size you want.  White charcoal or even chalk, is a great to get the highlights onto the paper and to create your full tonal range.

After you have trialed and experimented with using Charcoal on different papers, you should take on a still life drawing to test your technique.

Final Still Life

Less is more. One object or three objects…don’t go too far. Think of the scale of your piece-it can be bigger than what you did for graphite-especially if you are using blocks of charcoal.

Composition is important. If doing fruits, think of their interesting textures from inside as well as outside. Zoom in and think about placement on your final page.

Whole objects are not necessary and can focus your observation and make the piece more interesting too.

 

What paper will you use? This would have been decided from your previous trials with charcoal. Brown parcel paper perhaps to make the scale larger and involve white chalk too? White A3+ paper to capture some textures and work on main shadows?

Make time to set the composition and trial many variations before deciding on the final one. Do careful observations of the main forms and objects, then you can start to add the tones and details.

I will demonstrate in my next facebook live how I go about a still life using charcoal, in case you are anxious to start.

See you there 🙂

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 13 Learning from an Artist

Vincent Van Gogh

If you hear a voice within you say ‘you cannot paint,’ then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced.

Learning from an artist is a great exercise to really test and stretch your technical skills. It will force you to try new things and learn new approaches, and this can only be a good thing for a developing artist!

Vincent Van Gogh is one of my favourites. Just reading up on his life, or watching the film ‘Loving Vincent’ is bound to conjure up inspiration for you. However, art is subjective, and if you have another artist in mind for this task, use them instead. The skills you gain are the same and the objective of the task will end up the same also: Learning from an artist to build on your own skills and techniques.

So to start, research your artist. Create a page of information that inspires you…facts on their life, images of their work… it will give you a great starting point and can help you start to think like them. Van Gogh didn’t just want to paint what he saw. He wanted to paint what he felt… when you know the emotions that went into the art, as well as the technique, you will see the work in a completely new way.

Once you have found out about your artist, you should get to work on imitating their style and doing some samples of their technique to learn about it.

You could sketch places that have meaning to you, just like Van Gogh did. Or paint some sunflowers to capture their forms and use the brilliant tones of yellow on a blue background (like his Paris series).

Did you know he was heavily influenced by Japanese art prints? See the image below with Van Gogh’s version, on the right, of the original Japanese print on the left.

Image taken from google images: https://artchive.ru/news/3304~Van_Gogh_and_Japan_the_fascination_that_changed_Vincents_style

Maybe you could research some prints and imitate them, just like Van Gogh did. Sometimes, inspiration comes from copying the artist’s approach and ideas that inspired them. You don’t always just have to replicate a painting, or part of a painting, of theirs to learn from them.

 

The image here is of Starry Night that I did in a class with my students. It’s not supposed to be exactly the same, but we worked on how to layer the colours and tones to create a similar effect. And I added features and changed compositions slightly, just like you can, to focus on areas of interest. It has really helped students to learn a new style of painting and see what is possible if you apply a different approach to your art.

I’ll be showing you how we did it in my next facebook live tutorial. I hope to see you there 🙂

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 2: Universal Forms

Task 2 is encouraging you to develop the skill of drawing the universal forms in a realistic way. You can learn how tone and shadow sit on these 4 forms so that in future still life work you can observe the shadows and highlights more confidently.

The four forms are:

Cube

Cylinder

Cone

Sphere

Here are some demonstrations to help get started. I also use charcoal sometimes so that you can compare and see how tone can be built up. Task 3 is producing the forms in charcoal 🙂

First, here is the CUBE:

 

Here is the Cylinder:

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 8: Colour Theory & Still Life

Before you get started, go through the following blog post which discusses colour theory. When you know the basics of colour theory, painting becomes more effective (you will see why):

 

Task 8 Part 1: The Colour Wheel

 

Following on from colour theory, I will demonstrate some painting techniques for this tutorial.

This time I will be using acrylic paint on canvas.

In the demonstration video you will see me get to this point and produce the basis of a pear. What this image shows is the underpainting that I used to layer my image and this is how colour theory can come into play when you design your own art work. For this painting, I used crimson red.

Your Underpainting Has Three Primary Functions:

  • First: to create some texture, or build on the canvas.
  • Second: To put a colour underneath your painting, allowing that to impact your final work in some way.
  • Third: A way of laying out your painting to see whether all the elements balance up compositionally, and whether they “fit”.

For our pear painting, the first 2 functions are used for this art work. It helped me to create texture on the skin of the pear, and also allowed the colours to clash and sit on top of the red; this impacted how the colours blended from one to the other.

 

More on underpainting:

It’s a lovely thing to leave flashes of the ground colour showing through. You can experiment with this and have a lot of fun. Try using a colour that’s quite unexpected. If your image happens to have a lot of green, as an example, do your underpainting a luscious vibrant red. This is what is happening with your pear.

For other art works, a lovely hot pink is a fantastic colour to paint over. Little flashes of hot pink through your painting can often give it a lift it would not have had. This way lends itself to throwing chunks of colour onto your canvas, and allowing the “pure” ground colour to show through.

One of the other added benefits of painting onto a coloured ground, is that you can rough sketch in your painting in chalk. Cheap, easy to wipe off, and visible. Lots of time saved. You’ll see me do this in my demonstration.

 

Some artists like to mark out very clearly on their canvas the position of all of their elements. This is nice, but can sometimes lack the spontaneity of just hurling some paint around, and seeing where it takes you.

As your technique improves, you will become less constrained by the image you want to paint.  Throwing a rough outline of the painting at the canvas, allows you to balance everything (and here’s the beauty of acrylics) and 20 minutes later, make adjustments if you are not happy. It is all about layering and letting one layer dry to make way for the next. Mistakes can be covered up, or you can use the acrylic hue underneath to add to the next. Who cares if you have to move an object over 3 inches? It’s all part of the process, and gets you closer to being happy with the finished painting (without putting your paintbrush down). It’s also another layer of paint on the canvas to work with later on if you need to.

How do I choose my underpainting colour?

There are many colours that are traditionally used for underpainting: burnt or raw umber, burnt sienna, or ultramarine blue. Almost any pigment can be used as long as it is capable of producing an adequate value range from light to dark. Yellow or medium-toned pigments, for example, cannot do this. The broader question, however, is whether the underpainting colour should be similar to the dominant colour of the subject, or contrast with it?

 

Monochromatic Underpainting (same colour as the main image-like blue underpainting when painting water scene or skies):

  • Advantages: Recommended for those just learning the underpainting method, but also a solid choice for seasoned painters. Makes tonal studies that are beautiful in their own right.
  • Disadvantages: Initial strokes of full colour paint may look out of place against the monochromatic underpainting until more coverage is achieved-keep going and use warm colours on top to bring out a range of tone.

Complementary Underpainting (clashing colours that are opposite on the colour wheel, like red underpainting for a green pear!):

  • Advantage: Can provide exciting colour reactions as the subsequent layers of colours react with the underlying colour.
  • Disadvantages: Like the monochromatic underpainting, initial strokes of full colour may seem out of place until enough coverage is achieved

I will be using complementary colours and explain as I paint what is happening as each layer is added.

With a few extra details and a range of techniques of how to use acrylic paint, you can achieve a basic painting and progress with your technical skills in no time 🙂

See the video below to watch the live video tutorial below to learn how it is done…

Click here to watch the live video tutorial below to learn how it is done…

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 4- Still life in Graphite

We have been building up a very basic foundation here for drawing in tonal media. Now task 4 explores taking on a ‘final outcome’ to put some techniques and skills to the test.

We will soon be moving away from our tonal work so let’s try a Still Life drawing with our graphite pencils.

Things we have covered so far:

  • Observation Skills- right side of the brain
  • Tonal Scale & Universal forms
  • Charcoal Techniques
  • Composition Considerations

Now we need graphite techniques to complete our skills in observational drawing.

You can use similar skills developed using charcoal for your graphite drawing, such as using a kneaded eraser to help with highlights. Do what you feel is right for you whilst applying the full tonal range to your drawing.

The same composition techniques we have discussed will apply and you should refer back to your universal forms to remind yourself of the different highlights and shadows. This time it should be easier as you will have the objects in front of you; if your light is good (natural light by a window) and your choice of objects is good (range of sizes, forms, textures) then you should be finding it easier to observe and create successful observational drawings.

Doing some different mark making exercises will also help you to decide on your style. It will also develop your understanding and control of using a graphite pencil in different ways. We have looked at adding tone to our shapes in a Sfumato sort of way so far, but there are many others that might suit you better and give a different character to your work.

Check out this resource to help you:

Mark Making

Here is also the previous video to a Live Mark Making Lesson which could give you a head start.

 

Soon I will be demonstrating some more techniques in a Facebook Live to show you how to get going with this task. See you there soon.

 

Have fun and remember to share your work for friendly feedback to support your progress – Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and a friendly art community

Task 3- Part 2: Charcoal Still Life

After you have trialed and experimented with using Charcoal on different papers, you should take on a still life drawing to test your technique.

Universal forms now need to be tested in observational drawing. Finding objects that are interesting on their own, or mixed with other objects that altogether have a range of forms, is a good challenge for you to take on.

Less is more. One object or three objects…don’t go too far. Think of the scale of your piece-it can be bigger than what you did for graphite-especially if you are using blocks of charcoal.

Composition is important. If doing fruits, think of their interesting textures from inside as well as outside. Zoom in and think about placement on your final page.

Whole objects are not necessary and can focus your observation and make the piece more interesting too.

So get a photo of a set-up. Make it tonal so you can easily see the range of tones you create. These can be made very good when using natural light. Have the objects in front of you, as well as the photo, so all your references are there to do a great observation.

What paper will you use? This would have been decided from your previous trials with charcoal. Brown parcel paper perhaps to make the scale larger and involve white chalk too? White A3+ paper to capture some textures and work on main shadows? See my previous demonstration on Facebook Live (link below) to see how to practice charcoal basics first.

Make time to set the composition and trial many variations before deciding on the final one. Do careful observations of the main forms and objects, then you can start to add the tones and details.

 

I will demonstrate in my next facebook live how I go about a still life using charcoal, in case you are anxious to start.

See you there 🙂

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 3-Part 1: Universal Forms in Charcoal

Drawing the universal forms is great practice before taking on more challenging still life drawing. It allows you to learn about how light and shadow work on the main forms for all future drawing. It also gives you chance to experiment with a new media…in this case, charcoal.

There are many ways of using charcoal so get a range of equipment to experiment fully before deciding which is the best way for you:

You are aiming to produce each of the main forms: Cube, Cylinder, Sphere and Cone, using your charcoal media.

To get a richer experience, do try to leave the confines of a sketchbook. Larger pieces of paper work very well and allow for different expression of markings. Being able to smudge easily, you will find covering large papers much easier than with graphite.

Try white paper, but also tonal and black papers. I like to use brown parcel paper as it has a bit of texture, it’s cheap, and you can buy a roll and have the freedom to cut it to any size you want. For the darker paper choices, there is one piece of equipment missing from the image above that is worth having….white! White charcoal or even chalk, is a great to get the highlights onto the paper and to create your full tonal range.

So you can try creating each of the forms in turn (recommended) and also an arrangement all together, so that you can think more about shadows from neighbouring objects.

I will demonstrate in our facebook live sessions the different ways to use charcoal…I sure you will really love this media, as I do! See you there 🙂

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 2: Tonal Scale and Universal Forms

The aim is to add a tonal scale to Universal Forms.

Each of your Graphite Pencils will give you different variations of tone.

Use each of the pencils in turn to get used to how the tonal scale is created using them. The wider range of soft to hard pencils you have, the better this will be when creating your drawings.

 

Here is an exercise to try:

Task 2 Exercise

 

Universal forms are: Cube, Cylinder, Cone and Sphere. Once you can apply tone to all of these forms, you can observe and add tone to any object!

There are also many ways to add the tonal scale. Smooth and realistic is something you can build up to and develop this level of control. In between, there are other exercises that will help you to visualise tone and actually develop sketching techniques.

 

By the end of your practice, you want to be able to use graphite pencils with skill and control to create realistic forms.

 

You can then apply Task 1 and Task 2 together to observe any object in the future to produce your own still life drawings.

I will be demonstrating how to create 3D graphite pencil forms and still life work in upcoming tutorials on our Facebook Page.

 

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community where you will find a demonstration of this task- see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART

Task 1: Observational Drawing

Observe this line drawing. Copy the direction of the lines, the angles of the lines and carefully observe where they start and where they end. Look into the negative spaces to see the shapes that have been created…how big is the triangular shape created between lines? Or that semi circle or conical shape? By looking only at shapes and lines you will start to draw more accurately.

This is because the right side of your brain is looking at the image, not the left. If it is the left you may have noticed what this image is…

 

 

A bird!

If you draw it this way your left side of the brain will see ‘wings’, a ‘head’, a ‘beak’… when this happens you are less likely to draw accurately. You will accidentally draw what you think it should look like, rather than what it really does look like.

So this task gives you the opportunity to build on how to use the right side of your brain when drawing from observation. Go on to more complex line drawings to challenge how you are seeing these objects.

Turning the images upside down helps with the right side of your brain to work better. Use grids on top to help further with seeing where the lines meet, and which shapes the lines create when they meet or diverge.

You can even cover part of the image with paper and observe each part of the image in turn, completely taking away any familiarity of the image and letting the right side of your brain do its job.

At OCAD we look at the following two as a good start and also a challenge. Turn your drawing the right way round at the end to be amazed at how accurate you can be.

 

A simple horse for your first go 🙂

For a bigger challenge:

Picasso: 1973 Portrait Igor Stravinsky

 

You can use any line drawing to give it a go.

When you take on your still life observations next time, the task will seem that bit easier when you reduce the image in front of you, into shapes, lines, distances, angles and negative spaces.

Give it a go 🙂

Join our Facebook Group for LIVE lessons and friendly art community – see you there 🙂

Why not have a go at this and post your artwork for me to see. Maybe I or the community can offer support, encouragement and helpful feedback.  – share your work on TWITTER and INSTAGRAM – POST  using our hashtag #ONLINECOLLEGEART