OCAD Studio: Low Key Landscape Sketch – Part 2

  • Start by adding detail to the edge of the darkest form using the small pointed brush.
  • Look for where the forms are softer or harsher, and where you can find small elements like branches and twigs sticking out.
  • Then start to look for more detail at the edges of lighter masses of tone.
  • This could be more trees or reflections etc.
  • Finally, heighten the lightest tones, to create a subtle sense of glow.
  • Don’t use pure white paint though as we need to keep the general painting a bit darker to ensure that the lights on the opposite shore stand out and glow against the parvading gloom.
Materials
  • Small oil painting surface (primed canvas, panel or oil paper)
  • Ivory black, Titanium White and Ultramarine Blue oil paint
  • One medium bristle brush
  • Small pointed brush
  • Mineral spirits
  • Easel
  • Palette
  • Palette cups

OCAD Studio: Low Key Landscape Sketch – Part 1

  • Using the mineral spirits to dilute the paint, begin by sketching the major forms of the landscape.
  • Ideally, you should use a dark midtone mix of white, black and blue.
  • Once the major shapes have been blocked in as a line sketch, you can start filling in the masses of tone.
  • Start with the darkest part (pure black).
  • Then you can start mixing, and painting on, lighter masses using gradually more white and blue paint.
  • Keep working this way until you have covered all the white of the surface.
  • Ideally try to suggest the texture at the edge of the masses (in the case of this piece, I have suggested the ragged edges of the forest).
Materials
  • Small oil painting surface (primed canvas, panel or oil paper)
  • Ivory black, Titanium White and Ultramarine Blue oil paint
  • One medium bristle brush
  • Mineral spirits
  • Easel
  • Palette
  • Palette cups

OCAD Studio: Blocking in Hair

This lesson will show you a simple approach for drawing all sorts of hair types and styles. We will be using a separation of light and dark masses as the basis for the hair forms before layering texture over this base.

  • Start by finding the darkest shapes in the hair.
  • Sketch these shapes simply.
  • Fill in the shapes with an average dark tone.
  • You can then start to find gradient transitions that go from dark to light – away from these shadows and towards the highlights.
  • You may need to use the eraser to amplify the highlights.
  • You can also use gradual passes of light tone to soften the texture of the hair.