The Importance of Halftone Texture

This lesson will demonstrate the importance of paying attention to the texture found at the shadow / halftone edge on a form.

  • I begin with a basic sphere form; with the light and shadow separated.
  • It’s best to conceptualise this as the surface of the moon.
  • I then draw a series of crater all over the surface to explore the effect of the direction of light on the prominence / contrast found in each crater.
  • The craters that sit within the lightest part of the illuminated section will be mostly lit – they won’t cast a shadow in any particular direction.
  • Whereas those craters that sit at the edge of the light and dark will be ‘raked’ by the light, casting longer shadows as a consequence. This means that they appear a lot more contrasty (and prominent) than the lighter craters.
  • You can see evidence of this phenomenon in this starkly lit deer skull.
  • The bone that is most brightly illuminated shows little texture – whereas the parts of the bone right next to the shadow edge exhibit a lot more texture.
  • You can apply this principle to any textured surface that you draw or paint.
  • The more textured it is – the more the effect will stand out.

OCAD Studio: Charcoal Portrait Part 7

This series of lessons will walk you through the complete process for drawing a detailed portrait in charcoal paper.

In this session we will finish off the background using a variety of tools and finally reinforce the dark accents and highlights,

  • You can smooth out and smudge the background using a variety of tools, paper towel, sponges and brushes are all great.
  • Try to work in layers – smoothing out with a brush or sponge before laying tone back over with the charcoal.
  • Finally, you can clean up your highlights with the kneadable eraser and enhance the accents with your charcoal.
  • Then it’s finished!

Materials:

  • Toned paper
  • Charcoal
  • Kneadable Eraser
  • Sanding Block
  • Sharpener
  • Drawing Board
  • Easel

OCAD Studio: Charcoal Portrait Part 6

This series of lessons will walk you through the complete process for drawing a detailed portrait in charcoal paper.

In this session I show you how to develop the smaller forms across the portrait.

  • Use the same approach as ‘Part 5’ – sharpened charcoal and a kneadable eraser rolled to a point.
  • Try to focus on smaller forms such as the nose, eyes, lips etc. Develop the forms by making the tones darker as they move away from the light and brighter as they turn toward it.
  • You can also start to add highlights to the hair and finer strands to begin suggesting its texture.

Materials:

  • Toned paper
  • Charcoal
  • Kneadable Eraser
  • Sanding Block
  • Sharpener
  • Drawing Board
  • Easel