Learning from the Masters – John William Waterhouse Copy in Oils – Part 9

In this series we will be working on a master copy in oils. I am using a 19th Century painting of the mythological figure ‘Lamia’ by John William Waterhouse as my reference.

You can use the same reference by clicking the link below, or you can find your own masterpiece to work from.

http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Lamia-Waterhouse-1-scaled.jpg

In this session – I will be rendering the hair, using a mixture of glazing and direct painting techniques.

  • I begin by laying a glaze of burnt umber and black over the darkest parts of the hair.
  • Glazing deepens the tone and also increases the warmth.
  • If things get too warm when glazing you may need to make you colour cooler (you can do this by adding white, which greys things down.
  • I then patch in some more subdued colours over the lighter parts of the hair as my original colours were a bit too reddish.
  • Try to brush in the direction of the hair when painting – as this helps enhance the impression that the hair is flowing in a particular direction.
  • Finally, you can add any props or smaller embellishments throughout the hair (the pearl clasps in the case of this painting.
Materials:
  • OIL PAINTS
  • Titanium White
  • Ivory Black
  • Burnt Umber
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Cadmium Yellow – Cadmium Red
  • Alizarin Crimson
  • ODOURLESS MINERAL SPIRITS (OMS)
  • LINSEED OIL
  • RANGE OF LARGE AND SMALL OIL BRUSHES
  • PALETTE
  • PALETTE
  • CUPS
  • CANVAS

Learning from the Masters – John William Waterhouse Copy in Oils – Part 8

In this series we will be working on a master copy in oils. I am using a 19th Century painting of the mythological figure ‘Lamia’ by John William Waterhouse as my reference.

You can use the same reference by clicking the link below, or you can find your own masterpiece to work from.

http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Lamia-Waterhouse-1-scaled.jpg

In this session – I will be continuing to render the figure – focusing on the chest and right arm/hand.

  • I’ll be following the same process as the previous two sessions.
  • As time goes on, the rendering process will become easier as you will develop a better understanding of the particular colour mixtures that work well for any particular painting.
  • In this painting, I have to pay close attention to the relationship between cool (blues, greens) and warmer (yellow, red) tones.
  • My approach is to lay them in side by side and then gradually blend them together.
  • This creates a broken colour effect.
  • The final thing I do each session (before allowing the piece to dry) is lay in some lighter tones in the brightest areas.
  • This ensures that I don’t lose luminosity in the painting.
  • You will likely need to add a small amount of a strong colour to your lightest tones – to avoid them becoming too greyed out.
Materials:
  • OIL PAINTS
  • Titanium White
  • Ivory Black
  • Burnt Umber
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Cadmium Yellow – Cadmium Red
  • Alizarin Crimson
  • ODOURLESS MINERAL SPIRITS (OMS)
  • LINSEED OIL
  • RANGE OF LARGE AND SMALL OIL BRUSHES
  • PALETTE
  • PALETTE
  • CUPS
  • CANVAS

Learning from the Masters – John William Waterhouse Copy in Oils – Part 7

In this series we will be working on a master copy in oils. I am using a 19th Century painting of the mythological figure ‘Lamia’ by John William Waterhouse as my reference.

You can use the same reference by clicking the link below, or you can find your own masterpiece to work from.

http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Lamia-Waterhouse-1-scaled.jpg

In this session – I will be continuing to render the figure – focusing on the left arm.

  • In a similar fashion to how I approached the face in the previous session – I begin by making some slight adjustments to the temperature in the halftones and lights.
  • Primarily adding in some cooler (almost greenish) darker halftones as per the reference.
  • I also cooled down and brightened up the lightest tones slightly as well, because they were slightly too yellow and dark
  • Once the colours and tones were sufficiently adjusted, I use a range of dry and wet brushes to adjust and develop the more subtle blending and forms in the arm.
  • After the blendings are complete you can lay in your brightest colours again so that they retain their clarity relative to the halftones.
Materials:
  • OIL PAINTS
  • Titanium White
  • Ivory Black
  • Burnt Umber
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Cadmium Yellow – Cadmium Red
  • Alizarin Crimson
  • ODOURLESS MINERAL SPIRITS (OMS)
  • LINSEED OIL
  • RANGE OF LARGE AND SMALL OIL BRUSHES
  • PALETTE
  • PALETTE
  • CUPS
  • CANVAS

Learning from the Masters – John William Waterhouse Copy in Oils – Part 6

In this series we will be working on a master copy in oils. I am using a 19th Century painting of the mythological figure ‘Lamia’ by John William Waterhouse as my reference.

You can use the same reference by clicking the link below, or you can find your own masterpiece to work from.

http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Lamia-Waterhouse-1-scaled.jpg

In this session – I am working the first of several detail passes over the face of Lamia. I am using the following materials:

  • OIL PAINTS
  • Titanium White
  • Ivory Black
  • Burnt Umber
  • Ultramarine Blue
  • Cadmium Yellow – Cadmium Red
  • Alizarin Crimson
  • ODOURLESS MINERAL SPIRITS (OMS)
  • LINSEED OIL
  • RANGE OF LARGE AND SMALL OIL BRUSHES
  • PALETTE
  • PALETTE
  • CUPS
  • CANVAS

Process

  • I start by using my medium (1:1 linseed oil to OMS) to oil in the darker tones and create a ‘couch’ that will make it easier to blend the details into one another.
  • The I block in some colour and temperature (warm/cool) shifts over the dry layer below.
  • I keep adjusting these colours and tones while adding smaller transitions to define the smaller forms and details.
  • Once happy with these colours and tones, I begin to soften the transitions between colours and make the painting appear less blocky.
  • I will leave this until touch dry before working over this area again.