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  • as well as showing you examples of their portfolio of work!

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Latest Video Tutorials, Guides & Lessons…

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Fun Colour Study of a Houseplant – Continuing the Leaves

This series will show you how to create fun studies of plants in acrylics using a simple bold palette. In this lesson we will be following on from the previous session by continuing to add detail to individual leaves. You can download the reference image here: http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/P1090720-scaled.jpg Materials: - Acrylic paints: White, Bright Yellow, Bright Blue and Earth Red Water cups and water Palette - Paper towel Medium sized flat acrylic brush Small pointed brush Keep following the same process as the previous lesson.Refine the edges where necessary by sharpening them up or softening them.Neaten the general tones within the leaves if they're patchy. Then create blendings between the darker tones and highlights.This can be achieved by working quickly so that the paint is still blendable.Or you can use gradual washes of shifting tones. Keep going until all the leaves that fill the focal point of the image are complete ...
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Fun Colour Study of a Houseplant – Adding Detail Leaf by Leaf

This series will show you how to create fun studies of plants in acrylics using a simple bold palette. In this lesson we will be adding much more detail to individual leaves in the central focal point of the painting. I will be working slowly to show how you can gradually build up complex transitions when working in acrylics. You can download the reference image here: http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/P1090720-scaled.jpg Materials: - Acrylic paints: White, Bright Yellow, Bright Blue and Earth Red Water cups and water Palette - Paper towel Medium sized flat acrylic brush Small pointed brush Using a small, round brush - begin by neatening the edges of the first leaf.It may be easier to do this with more diluted paint, as that will fill the tooth or texture of the surface better. Then start laying in gradual washes of light colours that get gradually darker. You will need to mix a lot of the transitional tones as the paint will dry quickly as you work (this differs greatly from working in oils). Look for specific details like the illuminated edges of leaves and light glowing through the surfaces. It may take some time to build up very bright highlights as ...
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Fun Colour Study of a Houseplant – Neatening Edges and Shapes

This series will show you how to create fun studies of plants in acrylics using a simple bold palette. In this lesson I will show you how to neaten up your initial lay-in of colour, ready for more detailed passes. You can download the reference image here: http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/P1090720-scaled.jpg Materials: - Acrylic paints: White, Bright Yellow, Bright Blue and Earth Red Water cups and water Palette - Paper towel Medium sized flat acrylic brush Small pointed brush Begin by mixing up your darkest colour (likely a blend of your earth red and blue).Mix this with a bit of water to create a slightly runny consistency - then gradually work your way around the piece, filling in any ragged white edges.You can also use this as an opportunity to alter any mistakes in the shapes of the leaves etc. Once you've completed the darkest tones, you can mix lighter greens to do the same thing within the leaves.You can also neaten up and slightly embellish the plant pot. Finally, add some highlights back into the leaves using pure white.Acrylics tend to be quite transparent so we will keep doing more of these highlight passes of the next few sessions ...
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Fun Colour Study of a Houseplant – Laying in Simple and Bold Colours

This series will show you how to create fun studies of plants in acrylics using a simple bold palette. This lesson will cover the second stage - laying in the major colours in the painting as flat shapes. You can download the reference image here: http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/P1090720-scaled.jpg Materials: Your drawing from the first lessonAcrylic paints: White, Bright Yellow, Bright Blue and Earth RedWater cups and waterPalettePaper towelMedium sized flat acrylic brush Begin by mixing up a dark, neutral tone. The easiest way to do this is by adding your blue to the earth red, and keep mixing until it looks like a colour in between blue and red. This is as close to neutral as you will get. It will also be the darkest colour you can mix with this limited palette and serve as your black.Lay this dark tone into all the darkest parts of the image (referring to the reference)You may need to add a little bit of water to help the paint flow, but try to avoid making it too washy. Once you've laid in the darkest tonal masses, you can start adding patches of green for the leaves. To mix a cool green, add some yellow and ...
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Fun Colour Study of a Houseplant – Starting With a Pencil Sketch

This series will show you how to create fun studies of plants in acrylics using a simple bold palette. This lesson will cover the first stage - making a loose line drawing using pencil. You can download the reference image here: http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/P1090720-scaled.jpg Materials: Paper, canvas or panel suitable for acrylic paint Pencil Easel As this is going to be a sketchy approach - you don't need to use an eraser, but I recommend starting light with the pencil at first and only getting darker when you're more confident about the general proportions.Start with a few big, gestural shapes to approximately place the forms of the pot and leaves. Then place a few leaves at the limits of the group.The furthest left, furthest right, top etc. Then once you've got these more extreme placements, it's easy to just fill in the leaves that fill the space between.Pay attention to the particular character of each individual leaf. Some are more round, some are oblong etc. Finally, make the darker edge of the leaf forms darker (with a heavier line) - the darker edge will tend to be facing away from the light.Once you've done that, you can pop a few coats of ...
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Tips For Correcting Proportions in Your Drawings and Paintings

This short lesson will show you some techniques for making better corrections in your artworks. Proportions can be really tricky, so it's handy to have a few tricks up your sleeve when trying to figure out what's going wrong. These principles apply to both drawing and painting - whenever you're working realistically. Start by plotting a few basic points on the paper.You can use a vertical guideline (like the one above) to help get started.Pay attention to where the subject crosses this line, as well as how far to the right or left of the line it is. Use simple lines to approximately block in the main proportions of the form that you're copying.Don't worry if it's not accurate - you will just be using this as a starting point. The image on the left is my first at the foot and the one on the right is my corrected version.I primarily relied on 'horizontal and vertical alignments' to make the necessary adjustments.To do this I chose a point and imagined a horizontal or vertical line travelling out from it. Then I used that line to tell whether other points matched it's placement (were they too high or too low ...
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Realistic Charcoal Sketching – Tips for Finishing a Drawing Quickly

In this series we will be working from a sculpture in the Met Museum collection in New York. This is a great exercise for learning traditional drawing techniques in charcoal. The MET is a great free resource for artists who want to copy from high quality images and references. In the final sessions of this three part series, I will show you how to use accents, texture and quick blending techniques to get a finished look fast. You can download the original image I'm working from here: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collect...​ These are the minimum materials you will need: Drawing paper Compressed charcoal pencilHard willow charcoal Kneadable eraser Sharpen all your charcoal to start with (and try to keep it sharp throughout the final session).Then use the compressed charcoal to add some punch to the darker accents across the drawing. Adding selective detail and contrast this way is an efficient method to make the drawing look more finished without too much effort. You can also pass over larger areas of tone with your hard willow charcoal to smooth things out a bit (I recommend watching the video to see what I mean). Finally, see if you can find any little notches of texture ...
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Realistic Charcoal Sketching – Developing the Forms

In this series we will be working from a sculpture in the Met Museum collection in New York. This is a great exercise for learning traditional drawing techniques in charcoal. The MET is a great free resource for artists who want to copy from high quality images and references. In this session I will show you how to develop the forms in the shadows and halftones by loosely shading in tone. You can download the original image I'm working from here: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collect...​ These are the minimum materials you will need: Drawing paper Soft willow charcoal Kneadable eraser Use the same soft charcoal as stage 1, but this time you will need to sharpen it a bit as that will give you more control as you add smaller details.Start by darkening the shadows if needed. Then you can add the darkest parts of the shadows - this will start to give the impression of rounded forms within the darker areas of the drawing. Once the shadows are a bit more developed, turn your attention to the halftones. Working in large blocks of loosely shaded tone, start to add the darker halftones next to the shadow edge. Keep adding tone (or removing ...
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Realistic Charcoal Sketching – Getting Started

In this series we will be working from a sculpture in the Met Museum collection in New York. This is a great exercise for learning traditional drawing techniques in charcoal. The MET is a great free resource for artists who want to copy from high quality images and references. In this first session I will show you how to get started with a light and loose block-in of the main shapes and shadows. You can download the original image I'm working from here: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collect...​ These are the minimum materials you will need: Drawing paper Soft willow charcoal Kneadable eraser Begin by (very lightly) sketching in the basic outside proportions of your subject.Try to hold the charcoal as far back as possible - because this will help you to keep your lines super light. Once the outside proportions are in place, you can start to make some light notes for the placement of major features and forms (eyes, nose, mouth, chin, ears etc.).This is a good time to make corrections - because there isn't too much to change yet.Keep re-working these lines and shapes until they lock into place well. This will save you a lot of hassle later in the ...
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Learning from the Masters – John William Waterhouse Copy in Oils – Part 9

In this series we will be working on a master copy in oils. I am using a 19th Century painting of the mythological figure 'Lamia' by John William Waterhouse as my reference. You can use the same reference by clicking the link below, or you can find your own masterpiece to work from. http://drawandpaint4free.artcoursework.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/Lamia-Waterhouse-1-scaled.jpg In this session – I will be rendering the hair, using a mixture of glazing and direct painting techniques. I begin by laying a glaze of burnt umber and black over the darkest parts of the hair.Glazing deepens the tone and also increases the warmth.If things get too warm when glazing you may need to make you colour cooler (you can do this by adding white, which greys things down. I then patch in some more subdued colours over the lighter parts of the hair as my original colours were a bit too reddish.Try to brush in the direction of the hair when painting - as this helps enhance the impression that the hair is flowing in a particular direction. Finally, you can add any props or smaller embellishments throughout the hair (the pearl clasps in the case of this painting. Materials: OIL PAINTSTitanium WhiteIvory BlackBurnt ...
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